Recent Exhibition-Lynda Shalagan

LYNDA SHALAGAN

INSIDE: an explo­ration of the man­dala form

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH TO FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH

EXHIBITION HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:00 AM-3:00 PM

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH 2:00–3:30 PM

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At the Still Point of the Turn­ing World”
In Lyn­da Shalagan’s own words offered to us in the title of the exhi­bi­tion, we are invit­ed to share her explo­ration of the mandala’s form. In a most pro­found man­ner Shalagan’s art prac­tice, mature in nature, is gift­ed with the emp­ty­ing out of the self to allow for the oth­ers (in this case the beau­ti­ful man­dala inspired works in col­lage, fab­ric and paint) to become whol­ly what each needs to be. I would go fur­ther and sug­gest the beau­ty of the works in this exhi­bi­tion, are ground­ed in Shalagan’s expe­ri­ence of man­dalas rather than the ana­lyt­i­cal pur­suit of an under­stand­ing or com­pre­hen­sion of what they are. To accom­pa­ny Sha­la­gan we must join with her in the hope of expe­ri­enc­ing the dis­so­lu­tion of our own sense of sub­jec­tiv­i­ty, of self-cen­tred­ness, so that we too may be graced with the expe­ri­ence of our being ground­ed in the Oth­er (for some of us called God) and our being ground­ed in a rela­tion to all oth­ers of the cre­at­ed order. I offer the pos­si­bil­i­ty that “the still place at the cen­tre of the expe­ri­ence” which Sha­la­gan speaks to is, in the words of Thomas Mer­ton, “an encounter [with God] not as Being, but as Free­dom and Love.”[1]

- Ian McK­in­non Novem­ber 2016
“At the still point of the turn­ing world. Nei­ther flesh nor flesh­less;
Nei­ther from nor towards; at the still point, there the dance is,
But nei­ther arrest nor move­ment. And do not call it fix­i­ty,
Where past and future are gath­ered. Nei­ther move­ment from nor towards,
Nei­ther ascent nor decline. Except for the point, the still point,
There would be no dance, and there is only the dance.
I can only say, there we have been: but I can­not say where.
And I can­not say, how long, for that is to place it in time.”[2]
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[1] Thomas Mer­ton, Zen and the Birds of Appetite, (New Direc­tions Books, McClel­land & Stew­art Ltd. 1968) pp. 24–25
[2] T.S. Eliot, Burnt Nor­ton, The Four Quar­tets, T. S. Eliot : The Com­plete Poems and Plays (Har­court, Brace and Com­pa­ny 1952) pp. 119